HAITI PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS DECEMBER 2010
By admin On 3 Jan, 2011 At 09:24 PM | Categorized As News | With 0 Comments

A Graffiti is seen next to Presidential banners during elections in Haiti December 2010. haiti’s president Rene Preval said during celebrations in the city of Gonaives. “This is a dangerous road we are on. In addition to natural disasters, we are in a political crisis following the Nov. 28, 2010, elections,” while the country marked 207 years of independence from France. The Haitian general election, originally scheduled in Haiti for 28 February 2010, was postponed to 28 November. Ten senators and all 99 deputies were to be elected.[1] Presidential elections were also held, with a run-off scheduled for 16 January as no candidate received 50 percent of the votes cas. 2010. VP/ ZZ

U.N. peacekeepers from Sri-Lanka transport electoral material during elections in Haiti December 2010. haiti’s president Rene Preval said during celebrations in the city of Gonaives. “This is a dangerous road we are on. In addition to natural disasters, we are in a political crisis following the Nov. 28, 2010, elections,” while the country marked 207 years of independence from France. The Haitian general election, originally scheduled in Haiti for 28 February 2010, was postponed to 28 November. Ten senators and all 99 deputies were to be elected.[1] Presidential elections were also held, with a run-off scheduled for 16 January as no candidate received 50 percent of the votes cas. 2010. VP/ ZZ

Haitians argue and protest with electoral workers to cast their ballots during elections in Haiti December 2010. haiti’s president Rene Preval said during celebrations in the city of Gonaives. “This is a dangerous road we are on. In addition to natural disasters, we are in a political crisis following the Nov. 28, 2010, elections,” while the country marked 207 years of independence from France. The Haitian general election, originally scheduled in Haiti for 28 February 2010, was postponed to 28 November. Ten senators and all 99 deputies were to be elected.[1] Presidential elections were also held, with a run-off scheduled for 16 January as no candidate received 50 percent of the votes cas. 2010. VP/ ZZ

A Haitian casts his ballots during elections in Haiti December 2010. haiti’s president Rene Preval said during celebrations in the city of Gonaives. “This is a dangerous road we are on. In addition to natural disasters, we are in a political crisis following the Nov. 28, 2010, elections,” while the country marked 207 years of independence from France. The Haitian general election, originally scheduled in Haiti for 28 February 2010, was postponed to 28 November. Ten senators and all 99 deputies were to be elected.[1] Presidential elections were also held, with a run-off scheduled for 16 January as no candidate received 50 percent of the votes cas. 2010. VP/ ZZ

Haitians electoral workers show ballots during elections in Haiti December 2010. haiti’s president Rene Preval said during celebrations in the city of Gonaives. “This is a dangerous road we are on. In addition to natural disasters, we are in a political crisis following the Nov. 28, 2010, elections,” while the country marked 207 years of independence from France. The Haitian general election, originally scheduled in Haiti for 28 February 2010, was postponed to 28 November. Ten senators and all 99 deputies were to be elected.[1] Presidential elections were also held, with a run-off scheduled for 16 January as no candidate received 50 percent of the votes cas. 2010. VP/ ZZ

Haitians walk next to a burnt car after presidential elections in Haiti December 2010. haiti’s president Rene Preval said during celebrations in the city of Gonaives. “This is a dangerous road we are on. In addition to natural disasters, we are in a political crisis following the Nov. 28, 2010, elections,” while the country marked 207 years of independence from France. The Haitian general election, originally scheduled in Haiti for 28 February 2010, was postponed to 28 November. Ten senators and all 99 deputies were to be elected.[1] Presidential elections were also held, with a run-off scheduled for 16 January as no candidate received 50 percent of the votes cas. 2010. VP/ ZZ

U.N. peacekeepers from Brazil take on control during a protest after known the electoral result during presidential elections in Haiti December 2010. haiti’s president Rene Preval said during celebrations in the city of Gonaives. “This is a dangerous road we are on. In addition to natural disasters, we are in a political crisis following the Nov. 28, 2010, elections,” while the country marked 207 years of independence from France. The Haitian general election, originally scheduled in Haiti for 28 February 2010, was postponed to 28 November. Ten senators and all 99 deputies were to be elected.[1] Presidential elections were also held, with a run-off scheduled for 16 January as no candidate received 50 percent of the votes cas. 2010. VP/ ZZ

Haitians walk next to tires burnt during protests after known the electoral result during presidential elections in Haiti December 2010. haiti’s president Rene Preval said during celebrations in the city of Gonaives. “This is a dangerous road we are on. In addition to natural disasters, we are in a political crisis following the Nov. 28, 2010, elections,” while the country marked 207 years of independence from France. The Haitian general election, originally scheduled in Haiti for 28 February 2010, was postponed to 28 November. Ten senators and all 99 deputies were to be elected.[1] Presidential elections were also held, with a run-off scheduled for 16 January as no candidate received 50 percent of the votes cas. 2010. VP/ ZZ

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